Welcome to my page! Hope these links and info are helpful!

Welcome to my area of Senior assistance! Or Boomer News & Links

We have some excellent assisted living care centers here!


I have put together some valuable information here just for you! 55 & Older...
We are becoming the fastest growing group of citizens in the United States and there are unique
needs and tools available to help us grow into our finest years possible! With health, Finances,
Travel, Real estate issues, Legal issues, family and home issues, not to mention dating and optimal living in our prime of life. There are different issues we face as Seniors/Baby boomers than our younger
generation. We remember different times, and did not have all the tools available before to make our
lives so very active and satisfied. New and useful ways to plan a very full life with some of the
latest technology and professional guidance. Health Issues is one of our most important issues.

1. Health sustinance and wellness programs. Designed with the Senior/Boomer in Mind
2. What to do with our Retirement funds when the time comes
3. Housing. Downsizing and travel issues. Reverse Mortgage?  
4.Single Women and the growing senior/boomer age? Features
5. Entertainment and social events stimulating for our generation
6. Activities and pre-planned events specifically designed for us
7. Assisted Living centers, Family care,Inhome care or grouping in?
8. What's new in Health Care? Hearing aids, Vision, Upbeat info!
9. Physical fitness for over 55. Yoga, pilates, join the gym or?
These are a few of the helpful links I will provide for you to help you have every opportunity to
be in charge of your own well being and enjoy life at it's fullest potential!
Here is a very useful link to start in our local Vancouver Area.
Click on the active ink below:

http://www.cityofvancouver.us/seniormessenger.asp?infoID=28833


If you plan to live out your retirement years in your own home, adding universal design features will make aging in place safer and more comfortable. And if you should later sell the house, you'll find that buyers appreciate how these upgrades anticipate their
 future needs.

Unlike home improvements designed to make an immediate impression, universal design additions with the most sales appeal are those that go unnoticed until you point them out.
"The beauty of universal design is when you're able to incorporate something that looks great and doesn't jump out at you," says Paul Sullivan, a remodeling contractor in Newton, Mass.
In other words, says Armand Christopher, a Realtor who is designated a Seniors Real Estate Specialist: "You don't put in hospital-grade grab bars in a bathroom when you are remodeling."
Fortunately, you don't have to settle for the institutional look. From ergonomically designed faucet handles to skid-free flooring, today's universal design products are stylish and subtle. Financing options include home equity loans and reverse mortgages.

The best time to add aging-in-place upgrades to your home is before you need them, says Pat Rowen, an interior designer and Certified Aging in Place Specialist in Hillsdale, Mich. Rowen had to tackle a rush job when a client in his 80s fell and broke his hip just before Christmas, and she scrambled to track down materials and workers to do the needed remodel. She says the experience underscored the importance of planning ahead.

"If you have to do it under the gun at Christmastime, and you know that your husband is coming home in two weeks and you have a bathtub that he can't get into -- that's not the time to do the remodeling," Rowen says.

Here are nine ideas that can boost the value of your home and the quality of life you enjoy while you're living in it.

Related Links 
Get Help From Uncle Sam in Caring for Your Aging Parent 
How to Make Your 401(k) Money Last a Lifetime 
How to Decide an Appropriate Asset Allocation 
Two Documents Every Baby Boomer Needs to Have for Death Planning Related Video

 


5 Myths of Health-Care Reform Egypt Army Delivers Ultimatum to Tahrir Protesters Boeing Unveils its Newest, Biggest Jumbo Jet 6 Expenses You Should Never Put on a Credit Card Truth About Social Security Benefits and Wage Garnishment Make it Easier to Get Around

Create zero-step entries. If your home has a basement, Rowen suggests grading the landscape to create a new entry at the lower level. If you're thinking of building a ramp to an existing entry, consider placing it inside your garage instead of at the front door.

Make your doors easier to open. Sullivan recently installed several doors with levers instead of knobs for one of his clients. "It's for a young, single woman, but she loves it because if she's coming in with groceries in her arms, she can elbow the door handle and get through the door," he says.

Create clear 3-foot passageways to make it easier to accommodate a wheelchair or walker. This might mean widening your interior doorways as well as rearranging and de-cluttering rooms. "As people get older, they have a lot of stuff," Rowen says. "They need to think in terms of 'How can I get to and from everything I do without any furniture or clutter?'"

Improve Safety and Comfort

Swap out your old stove and faucet to reduce the risk of burns. An accidental scalding is less likely with a single-lever faucet than with one that has separate handles for hot and cold, Sullivan says. Therese Crahan, executive director of NAHB Remodelers, a division of the National Association of Home Builders, recommends buying a stove that has the controls in the front, so you won't have to reach over the heating elements.

Fall-proof your floors. Look for products such as nonslip vinyl and nonglossy tile in small patterns (the extra grout lines provide more slip resistance), Rowen says. It's also a good idea to eliminate variances in floor height from room to room, she says.

Add features that lessen the need for reaching up and bending over. Christopher suggests shopping for items such as kitchen cabinets with pull-down shelves, refrigerators with middle drawers and washers and dryers with raised platforms.

Upgrade the Bathroom

Prep your bathroom for grab bars, even if you're not ready to install them yet. "You can either put plywood on the wall before you put the drywall up or put blocking between the studs," Rowen says. Without that preparation, you are limited to installing the grab bars at the location of existing studs, or tearing out drywall to fit them in.

Put in an easy-to-use shower. Rowen likes the ones from Best Bath Systems, which offers a model with grab bars, a folding seat and hand-held sprayer for about $3,100. Curbless showers are another option. They are wheelchair-accessible and eliminate the need to step over a threshold. "The bathroom floor just rolls seamlessly into the shower," Sullivan says.

Sullivan adds that for experienced contractors, installing a curbless shower costs no more than doing a conventional one. "The one thing we have to do is waterproof the floor underneath," he says. "You're talking maybe 15 (additional) minutes of labor and $50 worth of materials. And you're not building and tiling the curb, so it's pretty much a wash."

Get a comfort-height toilet, which will raise you up about 17 inches off the floor and set you back $200 to $300, Rowen says. Those seat booster rings aren't nearly as efficient, according to Rowen, because they slip easily and are difficult to clean.





Local Senior Links and helpful community Info

For Seniors

The City of Vancouver coordinates a rich program of activities and services for seniors.

    50 and Better Activities
    Well over 100,000 Vancouver and Clark County seniors enjoy enrichment activities offered at the Luepke Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd. There are also lots of activities seniors at the Trapedero II, in Firstenburg Community Center.

    50+ Travel Program
    Since 1971 the Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation 50+ Travel Program has provided people over the age of 50 affordable group travel. Day-trips explore attractions, events, festivals, cultural activities and destinations with varied levels of difficulty. You'll meet new people and make friends. Trips are planned and escorted by trained volunteers so that you are able to sit back, enjoy the ride, your group and your destination. Overnight trips in the Pacific Northwest, the United States, overseas and/or cruises are arranged through approved travel agencies. Contact Nancy Olsen at 360-487-7053 for program information. Frequently asked questions regarding the 50+ Travel program.

    Senior Messenger Newspaper
    The Senior Messenger is the 3rd largest newspaper in Clark County. It is mailed free to anyone 50 or older who requests it. Read about active adults, travel, health, education and leisure information, legislative information and other matters of interest to SW Washington's senior residents. Revenue is from reader donations and paid advertising.

    Loaves & Fishes - The Meals-On-Wheels People
    Loaves & Fishes provides a hot, nutritious noon meal Monday-Friday. Com join the fun. Meet new friends, dance, play bingo and get involved. A suggested donation of $2.75 is asked for lunch.

    Senior Centers For Clark County

    Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)
    People from all walks of life contribute their skills, knowledge and time to worthwhile community efforts through RSVP. Enjoy an active retirement lifestyle while helping others. RSVP is open to people 55 and older, retired or semi-retired. Call (360) 694-6577.

    All of the info above can be viewed by clicking on the link below

    Click here: Vancouver-Clark Washington Parks & Recreation: Recreation Programs


LONG-TERM CARE

Tools

Checklist: Evaluating Assisted-Living Facilities (PDF)

Here are some questions you should ask when looking into assisted-living facilities.

Checklist: Evaluating Nursing Homes (PDF)

Bring this checklist with you to compare nursing home facilities.

Chart: Average Cost of Long-Term Care by State

Look up the average cost in your state for a nursing home, assisted living facility or home health aide.

Home Health Agency Search

Search and compare home health agencies in your community.

Nursing Home Search

Search and compare nursing homes in your community.

Benefits QuickLINK

Find out what public or private benefits are available to caregivers.

AARP Programs

Divided We Fail

Ensure affordable, quality health care for all.

AARP Books

Book: Caring For Your Parents

Caring for Your Parents: The Complete AARP Guide

By Barbara Basler

Boomers looking to care for their parents are learning hard lessons early: Long-term care is expensive-and only those who are virtually impoverished qualify for government aid.

 

Guided Care

From Prime Time Radio

In this AARP Radio piece, Dr. Chad Boult explains why one health professional should guide all aspects of care, uniting the patient, family, and doctors.

 

Palliative Care: The Comfort Connection

By Joanne Kenen

Dr. Diane Meier is quietly leading a revolution to treat patients and their families as living, feeling individuals. Why is that so shocking?

From the Online Community

Group: Short & Long Term Memory Loss

Group: Memory Loss
Exchange advice on memory loss in friends and relatives.
Join Group

Group: No Rest for the Weary Here

Group: No Rest for the Weary Here
Lend support to fellow full-time caretakers.
Join Group

This Village Takes Care of its Elders

From Prime Time Focus

AARP Radio spotlights D.C.'s Capitol Hill for this community's efforts to help older residents live in their homes longer.

Nursing Homes, Undercover

By Barry Corbet

We think nursing homes are just for older people, but that's not always true.

More Long-Term Care Articles





Washington Senior Living

Vancouver Senior Communities

Looking for an assisted living or senior living community?

Find the right senior community or assisted living facility with the

Senior Transitions Community 

Fill out a quick assessment form or Call Toll Free 866-353-5337 to speak to specialist now.

Below is a sample of the senior living communities that are currently available in our database. If you do not see one listed for the area in which you are interested, please give us a call at 866-353-5337. Our specialists are always available to perform a unique search for you, or to simply answer any questions that you may have.

This directory of assisted living homes, independent living communities and senior retirement communities shows the locations of some of the best senior facilities throughout the country:

 

Olympic Place Retirement and Assisted Living
Arlington, WA  98223
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Auburn Meadows Senior Community
Auburn, WA  98002
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Brighton Gardens of Bellevue
Bellevue , WA  98007
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Sunrise of Bellevue
Bellevue , WA  98008
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Fairhaven Estates
Bellingham , WA  98225
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Sunrise of Edmonds
Edmonds, WA 98020
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Arbor Place at Silver Lake
Everett, WA 98208
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Seabrook
Everett, WA 98204
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Village Green
Federal Way, WA 98003-7026
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

The Woodmark at Steel Lake
Federal Way, WA 98003
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Aegis Senior Inn of Issaquah
Issaquah, WA  98027
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Aegis of Kent
Kent, WA 98031
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Kirkland Lodge
Kirkland, WA 98033
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Arbor Village Retirement & Assisted Living Community
Kent, WA  98030
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Woodland Retirement and Assisted Living Community
Lacey, WA  98503
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Sunrise of Lynnwood
Lynnwood, WA  98037
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Monticello Park Retirement and Assisted Living
Longview, WA  98632
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Harmony of Madison
Madison , WA  53714
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Fountain Court Assisted Living
Maple Valley, WA  98038
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Sunrise of Mercer Island
Mercer Island, WA  98040
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Normandy Park Assisted Living
Normanday Park, WA  98148
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Red Oak Residence of North Bend
North Bend, WA  98045
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

The Sequoia
Olympia, WA  98506
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Park Vista Retirement and Assisted Living
Port Orchard, WA  98366
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Seaport Landing Retirement & Assisted Living
Port Townsend, WA  98368
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Courtyard at the Willows
Puyallup, WA 98374
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Silver Creek Retirement and Assisted Living
Puyallup, WA  98375
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Overlake Terrace
Redmond, WA 98052
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Renton Villa
Renton, WA  98055
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Emeritus Oaks
Silverdale, WA 98383
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Sunrise of Snohomish
Snohomish, WA 98290
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Stafford Suites
Sumner, WA 98390
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Cascade Park
Tacoma, WA 98402
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Renaissance at Narrows Glen
Tacoma, WA 98406
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Bridgewood at Four Seasons Retirement and Assisted
Vancouver, WA  98684
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Columbia Heights Retirement and Assisted Living
Wenatchee, WA  98801
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Riverwest Retirement Community
Wenatchee, WA  
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

RiverWest Retirement Community
Wenatchee, WA  98801
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us

Rosemont Retirement and Assisted Living
Yelm, WA  98597
(866) 353-5337
Contact Us


About Senior Living

senior transition and retirement living spacer

There really is no place like home. When asked about their preference for housing, most seniors answer, "What l would really like to do is to stay right here." The person's own home represents security and independence to most Americans.

Most housing, however, is designed for young. active and mobile people. To live at home, a person must, at the very least, have access to transportation, go shopping, cook. and do household chores. Many of us will lose one or more of these abilities as we grow older.

One option is to purchase in home services, to cope with declining abilities. For a fee, an army of workers will appear to cut your grass, wash your windows, cook your meals, do the shopping, and even provide personal care and/or skilled nursing care. This may be the option for you, depending on the amount of help you need. However, this can be expensive and will require a lot of management and coordination.

For people willing to relocate, there are plenty of options, although there may be some confusion about what all the terms mean. You may hear about "board and care homes," "personal care homes," "life care" and "continuing care retirement facilities." All refer 'to some type of "assisted living" or service-oriented housing.

Housing With Services

As we age, we want to focus more on activities we enjoy than on the trivial ones. If you feel this way and you´re looking for an environment that will let you focus on the activities and people you enjoy, than housing with services is the place for you. It provides a home in which your medical as well as general clean needs are managed for you.

Housing with Services Include:

There are several types of residential care options available in most communities. However, the names used to refer to each type may vary from state to state. In addition, some types will be licensed and required to follow set regulations. It is important to remember that not all settings within any category will be appropriate for people with dementia, or may not be able to provide care throughout the progression of the disease. Therefore, consider how long a setting will be appropriate and when another move may be required. Keep in mind, that moving a person with dementia into a new environment can cause increased agitation and confusion.

 

 

Senior Transitions is dedicated to assisting seniors in finding communities that will meet their increasing needs as they age.  From Independent Living to Continuing Care, we have access to some of the best residential communities across the country. Let us help you with the transition from your home into a senior community.
senior community spacer retirement living
senior assisted living communities Be Prepared: Know the costs. Assisted living can be expensive. Be familiar with what each facility charges for the various levels of care, plus the individual charges for extra services beyond the monthly rate. Examine your finances. Monthly rates vary. Determine your affordable price range and shop accordingly. Will family members contribute and how much? Are other benefits (VA and Long-Term Health Care) available?assisted living choices Learn about assisted living and senior living terminology. Find out what services are provided by the residences in your area. Keep in mind that residences can vary greatly. Shop around. Finding a new home takes time. Plan ahead to visit as many residences as you can. Know what services you need and what to shop for. Make an appointment to meet with staff.
senior community spacer retirement living
california senior assisted living communityActive Lifestyle doesn't have to end. Maintaining a healthy level of exercise and good diet shouldn't stop just because we age. Evaluation of the right senior living community needs to encompass the lifestyle of the future resident. Active seniors need access to a different variety of services than someone who requires skilled nursing or even seniors of a sedentary nature.Find a senior assisted The Golden Years can truly be golden. Selecting the proper community for your individual needs makes all the difference in the world. Visit and revisit. Drop in for lunch. Once you've decided on your top choices, revisit each facility at least one more time and at different times during the day. Talk to staff, residents, other family members, and the local long-term care ombudsman. Gather as much information as you can to make the best choice.
senior community spacer retirement living
Senior living Assisted livingBe Thoughtful: In most cases, adult children play a major role in helping a parent secure an assisted living home. Respect the interests, needs, and wishes of your loved one. Although many assisted living communities offer a lifestyle that preserves autonomy and dignity, moving from home to a new place can be a difficult transition. Work together to make plans and decisions. Don't exclude your parent from the process.senior living assisted livingHere at Senior Transitions, our qualified and caring staff will help you make educated and well-planned choices for your future home. We know that those in transition need empathetic and thoughtful assistance while they make one of the most difficult choices of their lives. Working with seniors and their families, we can provide the solutions you need.

 

What is Assisted Living?

senior transition and retirment living spacer


space

While assisted living centers have been available the United States for many years, the growth and availability of assisted living has had a dramatic increase since the early 1990s. Assisted living is a residential alternative that promotes maximum independence for each resident through a combination of supportive services and assistance. The definition of assisted living from one state to another may vary and so will the cost and types of service. 

Assisted living centers vary in size, style and the optional services they may offer. Small family style living or the larger complex of units can be found in the United States. Some facilities are operated by nonprofit organizations, while others are proprietary. In addition, some facilities may be co-located or affiliated with a hospital or nursing facility.

An assisted living center is any institution, rest home, boarding home, place, building or agency that is maintained and operated to provide personal care and services which meet some need beyond basic provision of food, shelter and laundry in a free standing, physically separate facility which is not otherwise required to be licensed.

In general terms, an assisted living center is required to provide assistance with daily living activities, including eating, bathing, dressing and personal hygiene; three meals a day; supervision of self-administration of medications; laundry service including personal laundry; housekeeping; and 24 hour staffing.

Housing Highlights - Assisted Living

Assisted living communities are designed for individuals who cannot function in an independent living environment, but do not need nursing care on a daily basis. Assisted living communities usually offer help with bathing, dressing, meals, and housekeeping.

Assisted living residences are:

1. Housing environments which provide individualized health and personal care assistance in a home-like setting. The level of care available is between that provided in congregate housing (housing with meal service) and a skilled nursing facility. In these settings:

  • Residents are semi-independent physically or mentally, or frail persons who need frequent assistance;
  • Services offered include, personal care assistance, health care monitoring, limited health care services and/or the dispensing of medications;
  • State licensing and regulation by state social welfare agencies is required.

2. Iimportant because they promote independence by meeting residents' supportive needs while preventing inappropriate institutionalization.

3.known by various other names. The most common are: personal care homes, sheltered housing, residential care, homes for adults, managed care, catered living, board and care, and domiciliary care.

Who Resides In Assisted Living Residences?

Assisted living housing is often deemed necessary when you have difficulty performing daily tasks and have no one to help you. Some indicators are:

  • Needing help preparing meals, bathing, dressing, toileting, or taking medication -needing assistance with housekeeping chores or laundry
  • Requiring some health care assistance or monitoring 
    needing transportation to doctors, shopping, and personal business
  • Feeling frequently confused or experiencing memory problems


What is Independent Living?

senior transition and retirment living spacerIndependent Living is an residential living setting for elderly or senior adults that may or may not provide hospitality or supportive services. Under this living arrangement, the senior adult leads an independent lifestyle that requires minimal or no extra assistance. Generally referred to as elderly housing in the government-subsidized environment, independent living also includes rental assisted or market rate apartments or cottages where residents usually have complete choice in whether to participate in a facility's services or programs.

What is Congregate Housing?

 

senior transition and retirment living spacer

Congregate Housing is similar to independent living except that it usually provides convenience or supportive services like meals, housekeeping, and transportation in addition to rental housing.

These are multiunit housing buildings (private rooms or full apartments) that are restricted to persons over a specified age and that include supportive assistance. Typically, monthly charges include rent and supportive services. Congregate housing does not require licensure or certification by a public agency as personal care services (help with eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, toileting, transferring) are not provided or included in the monthly charge. Congregate housing residents may contract privately with community home care agencies to receive personal care and home health care services. Monthly charges may be priced at market rates or subsidized with government assistance.


What Are Continuing Care Retirement Communities?

senior transition and retirment living spacerA continuing care retirement community (CCRC) is a community which offers several levels of assistance, including independent living, assisted living and nursing home care. It is different from other housing and care facilities for seniors because it usually provides a written agreement or long-term contract between the resident (frequently lasting the term of the resident's lifetime) and the community which offers a continuum of housing, services and health care system, commonly all on one campus or site.

What is a Nursing Home?

Nursing Homes provide 24-hour skilled care for the more acute patients. Patients generally rely on assistance for most or all daily living activities (such as bathing, dressing and toileting).



What is a Residential Board and Care Home?

 
senior transition and retirment living spacer

Residential Board and Care Homes are small residential family homes which provide 24-hour custodial care for four to six residents. All custodial care, meals, and activities are provided by live-in full-time staff. Most are licensed to accept non-ambulatory residents and have been constructed with these residents needs in mind (e.g., wheelchair accessible bathrooms and inside/ outside ramps).

Board and Care Homes

Board and care homes go by many names (including personal care homes, residential care facilities, assisted living, and domiciliary care). In exchange for rent, generally they provide room, meals, laundry and house-keeping, and regular contact with staff to ensure that "all is well." The daily contact with staff is what distinguishes "board and care" homes from the more familiar boarding houses. Your parent would share this home, of course, with a number of other residents.

Visit the home with your parent before a decision is made. Look at the private room your parent may occupy. Ask lots of questions about the services and evaluate the staff. Ask for references and check the home's record with the local or State licensing agency.

Consider these issues:

  • Will your parent have privacy and independence?
  • Is common space available?
  • How much will it cost, including add-ons to the rent?
  • Is it near public transportation, places of worship, and shopping?
  • Can your parent's special dietary needs be met?
  • Does the home comply with local licensing, fire, and zoning laws? Is it licensed by the State?
  • What are the arrangements for sharing bathrooms?
  • Will your parent have to climb stairs?
  • Are there security locks on each room?
  • Will your parent have access to a telephone?
  • Are pets allowed? Who will care for them?

 

Understanding Just What a Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Can Mean

 

senior transition and retirment living spacerDistinctly different from the mild forgetfulness normally observed in older people, Alzheimer's disease is a degenerative disease of the brain from which, at this time, there is no recovery. The disease slowly and irreversibly attacks nerve cells in all parts of the cortex of the brain, as well as some surrounding structures. Alzheimer's disease affects a person's memory, language, motor skills, sensory function, abstract thinking (judgment, making plans, etc.), and eventually even affects the ability to recognize loved ones, friends, and once-familiar objects. The combination of all these changes has devastating effects on the person's relationships, social life, and occupational life (including work, school, shopping, hygiene, finances, etc.). 

An estimated 4.5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease. While Alzheimer's disease is certainly not the foregone result of "getting old," unless a cure for the disease is found that number is expected to triple in the next 20 years as more people live into their 80's and 90's. 

Symptoms of Alzheimer's 

Finding out that you or someone you care about has been diagnosed with Alzheimer's can be devastating. You may not know what to do, what to expect, or where to turn for help. Understanding the symptoms is important. Alzheimer's is not a disease characterized by memory impairment alone. Typically, a combination of symptoms defines the illness. 
  • Memory impairment is the most common and one of the defining symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. In the early stages of the disease, the person may forget small things, like a doctor's appointment or name of the mailman. Sadly, this impairment progresses to forgetting to finish tasks (like turning off the stove and water), and eventually to even forgetting relatives' names. When forgetfulness is a problem, Alzheimer's patients sometimes become paranoid, and, for example, may believe that people are stealing from them. Remember that everyone forgets occasionally and that common forgetting does not mean that you have Alzheimer's disease.

  • Language difficulties are also consistent in Alzheimer's patients. At first, the person may just have difficulty in finding the right word, but as with the other symptoms, the difficulty gets worse. A person in later stages may have problems with speaking and understanding language. The ability to repeat words is well preserved but naming, speaking, and comprehension deteriorates as the disease progresses. 

  • Abstract thinking is also affected as Alzheimer's disease progresses. Abstract thinking deals with activities that involve a multi-step process and that require reasoning and judgment. Planning and organizing can become increasingly difficult and eventually, impossible. Activities once taken for granted (such as balancing the checkbook and reading) can become very difficult. A caregiver must be willing to understand what effect this loss of independence can have on the person and be willing to help in the completion of these duties in a subtle and tactful (and not overbearing) manner. 

  • Personality changes which may occur are often the most difficult symptom for loved ones to handle. A previously calm, caring spouse may become irritable, stubborn, and depressed without warning. Before Alzheimer's disease is diagnosed, the spouse of the person may see these changes as problems in their relationship and may become totally fearful or awe-struck by the change in the person. These changes are not the person's fault and do not indicate any change in feeling toward a spouse or loved one. 

  • Disorientation and confusion are also common -- a person will not know the date, time, or even where he or she lives. The person with Alzheimer's disease may wander aimlessly and not be able to find their way home.

These symptoms may start off mild and progressively worsen. In the final stage of Alzheimer's disease, the person is incapable of caring for himself or herself, talking with others, or paying attention. 


Causes of Alzheimer's Disease

As researchers work hard to find the cause of Alzheimer's disease, several theories have been developed that, while neither proven nor disproven, may shed light on why some people develop the disease. A few popular theories include: 

Chemical Theories

While the cause of Alzheimer's disease is still not known, it is understood that two significant abnormalities occur in the brains of those afflicted by the illness: twisted nerve cell fibers, known as neurofibrillary tangles, and a sticky protein called beta amyloid. 

Neurofibrillary Tangles

The tangled fibers are the damaged remains of microtubules, the support structure that permits the flow of nutrients through the nerve cells.

Beta Amyloid

A high concentration of placques of a protein known as beta amyloid forms patches called neuritic placques outside the nerve cells and grossly obstructs the normal function of neurotransmitters which are the chemical messengers in the brain.

Genetic Theory

Researchers have found some people have a genetic predisposition to Alzheimer's disease. Recently, several different genes have been discovered that may possess a link to Alzheimer's disease. More research needs to be to determine why some people have this predisposition and others develop the disease with no family history. Some studies suggest that the genetic factor may need to combine with some other environmental factor to produce the illness. 

Autoimmune Theory

Sometimes, the immune system turns against the person's body. Some researchers think the immune system may turn against the brain and cause damage to it that results in the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

Slow Virus Theory

Some diseases are caused by viruses. It is possible that a virus could attack the brain and cause changes that result in the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. 

Blood Vessel Theory

This theory suggests that there is a break in the blood-brain barrier. This barrier is a thin membrane that keeps toxic substances and foreign bodies from entering the brain. If the barrier were to break, it is possible that these toxic substances could enter and cause damage to the brain resulting in the symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. Note that this theory differs from hardening of the arteries in the brain and stroke. 


Treatment For Alzheimer's Disease

Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible and progressive illness. This means there is not yet a cure for the disease and that it will get worse over time. Therapy can provide significant help, for the person with Alzheimer's, as well as for their close family members whose lives are also markedly impacted by the effects of the disease. Medications are also useful in managing the patient's symptoms of Alzheimer's.

A person with Alzheimer's disease will live an average of eight years and as many as 20 years or more from the onset of symptoms. From the time of diagnosis, people with Alzheimer's disease survive about half as long as those of similar age without dementia. Average survival time is affected by age at diagnosis and severity of other medical conditions.

For much of the course of their illness, a person with Alzheimer's can still partake in many activities with family and friends, especially if others are kept aware of the person's limitations. Many people retain the ability to demonstrably give and receive love throughout their illness.

Source: 4therapy.com

Confused about the relationship between Medicare, Medicaid and long term housing solutions? Read below for some clarification.
(provided by the Better Business Bureau)

Medicare
Many people mistakenly believe that Medicare, which is administered by the Health Care Financing Administration, covers the costs of most long-term care services. In reality, Medicare only covers short- term, acute care during a hospital stay.

Medicare is a federal insurance program that provides insurance to millions of Americans who meet the following criteria:
1. People who are 65 years of age
2. People who are disabled; and
3. People with permanent kidney failure.

Medicare (Part A) may help to pay for nursing care only if a person meets all of the following conditions:
4. A person requires daily skilled nursing or skilled rehabilitation services that can only be received in a Skilled Nursing Facility (SNF). This need must be certified by a doctor.
5. A person has been hospitalized for at least three days in a row (not including the day of discharge) prior to entering a SNF.
6. A person enters the SNF within a short time (usually 30 days) after leaving the hospital.
7. A person's care is for an illness that was treated in the hospital or arose when he or she was in a SNF for an illness treated in a hospital.

Medicare (Part A) can help pay up to 100 days of skilled care in a SNF during a benefit period. It pays for all covered services for the first 20 days. For days 21-100, a daily co-insurance amount can be charged to a Medicare recipient. If a person requires more than a 100 days in a benefit period, he or she is responsible for all charges beginning with the 101st day of continued residence at a SNF.


Medicaid
Medicaid is an assistance program jointly financed by federal and state governments for needy and low-income people of all ages. Using broad federal guidelines, states design their own programs. Therefore, exact details of eligibility will vary from state to state.

Under certain qualifying conditions, Medicaid will pay for care in Skilled Nursing Facilities (SNFs) and also Intermediate Care Facilities (ICFs). Depending on the situation, if a person is eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid, Medicare will pay for its allowable benefits period if all requirements are met, after which, Medicaid will take over the financial assistance.


Private Insurance Policies
Some insurance companies offer private insurance policies specifically for long-term nursing home care. These policies vary widely in coverage and cost, and it is important to understand precisely what kind of policy you are purchasing.

Make sure the policy being considered does not duplicate skilled nursing facility coverage provided by any coordinated care plan such as Medicare or Medicaid or other coverage already received. Check for any prerequisites required before the company will pay benefits. For example, ask if the company requires that a patient have prior hospitalization before any benefits are paid out. Some diseases such as arthritis-related problems and Alzheimer's do not require hospitalization before the need for nursing care arises.

If possible, seek an insurance policy that pays benefits immediately upon entry into a nursing care facility. Many insurance policies, which are purchased prior to the need for nursing care, require a waiting period after entry into a nursing care facility before payments are made. It is highly unlikely that nursing care insurance can be purchased after a person has entered a nursing care facility.

Another private insurance policy, Medigap supplemental insurance, is designed to close the gap between medical costs and amounts paid by Medicare. However, both Medicare and Medigap are primarily designed for short term, acute care and, consequently, are unlikely to meet the long-term needs of nursing care residents.

As in all insurance policies, it is vital that you understand exactly what your policy covers. Specific questions about policies should be directed to your state's insurance commissioner.


For Seniors

The City of Vancouver coordinates a rich program of activities and services for seniors.

    50 and Better Activities
    Well over 100,000 Vancouver and Clark County seniors enjoy enrichment activities offered at the Luepke Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd. There are also lots of activities seniors at the Trapedero II, in Firstenburg Community Center.

    50+ Travel Program
    Since 1971 the Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation 50+ Travel Program has provided people over the age of 50 affordable group travel. Day-trips explore attractions, events, festivals, cultural activities and destinations with varied levels of difficulty. You'll meet new people and make friends. Trips are planned and escorted by trained volunteers so that you are able to sit back, enjoy the ride, your group and your destination. Overnight trips in the Pacific Northwest, the United States, overseas and/or cruises are arranged through approved travel agencies. Contact Nancy Olsen at 360-487-7053 for program information. Frequently asked questions regarding the 50+ Travel program.

    Senior Messenger Newspaper
    The Senior Messenger is the 3rd largest newspaper in Clark County. It is mailed free to anyone 50 or older who requests it. Read about active adults, travel, health, education and leisure information, legislative information and other matters of interest to SW Washington's senior residents. Revenue is from reader donations and paid advertising.

    Loaves & Fishes - The Meals-On-Wheels People
    Loaves & Fishes provides a hot, nutritious noon meal Monday-Friday. Com join the fun. Meet new friends, dance, play bingo and get involved. A suggested donation of $2.75 is asked for lunch.

    Senior Centers For Clark County

    Retired & Senior Volunteer Program (RSVP)
    People from all walks of life contribute their skills, knowledge and time to worthwhile community efforts through RSVP. Enjoy an active retirement lifestyle while helping others. RSVP is open to people 55 and older, retired or semi-retired. Call (360) 694-6577.

For Seniors

The City of Vancouver coordinates a rich program of activities and services for seniors.

    50 and Better Activities
    Well over 100,000 Vancouver and Clark County seniors enjoy enrichment activities offered at the Luepke Center, 1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd. There are also lots of activities seniors at the Trapedero II, in Firstenburg Community Center.

    50+ Travel Program
    Since 1971 the Vancouver-Clark Parks and Recreation 50+ Travel Program has provided people over the age of 50 affordable group travel. Day-trips explore attractions, events, festivals, cultural activities and destinations with varied levels of difficulty. You'll meet new people and make friends. Trips are planned and escorted by trained volunteers so that you are able to sit back, enjoy the ride, your group and your destination. Overnight trips in the Pacific Northwest, the United States, overseas and/or cruises are arranged through approved travel agencies. Contact Nancy Olsen at 360-487-7053 for program information. Frequently asked questions regarding the 50+ Travel program.

    Senior Messenger Newspaper
    The Senior Messenger is the 3rd largest newspaper in Clark County. It is mailed free to anyone 50 or older who requests it. Read about active adults, travel, health, education and leisure information, legislative information and other matters of interest to SW Washington's senior residents. Revenue is from reader donations and paid advertising.

    Loaves & Fishes - The Meals-On-Wheels People
    Loaves & Fishes provides a hot, nutritious noon meal Monday-Friday. Com join the fun. Meet new friends, dance, play bingo and get involved. A suggested donation of $2.75 is asked for lunch.

    Senior Centers For Clark County

    ) 694-6577.



Age Restricted Communities- Why Ages 55 and 62 01/01/2011

Age Restricted Communities- Why Ages 55 and 62

What is about the 55 and 62 age limits? How did Age Qualified Retirement Communities come about? Find out with this article.


55 and 62 Age Limits for Retirement Communities


 


As you might have noticed when looking for your retirement community, many communities geared toward retirees all talk about 55 and 62 age limits. It seems like the numbers are random sometimes but in actuality they're rooted in The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 which modified the Civil Rights Act of 1968. This update added families and handicapped people to the list of those who couldn't be discriminated against.

 

However, there were two exceptions that were made in regards to housing communities for seniors. The law created the term "age restricted" which means a community completely made up of people who are 62 years and older OR a minimum of 80 percent of the housing units had at least one person who was 55 years or older.

 

Potential home buyers who are 55 years of age or older have three choices for the kind of community they may want to move to next. They can choose a community specifically restricted to those 55 and older, a community that is predominately in that age bracket, or a community with no specific age dominance. Inside the industry, communities restricted to those 55 and older are usually called "age-qualified," due primarily to marketing concerns and presumed negative connotations associated with the word "restricted." Such communities generally require householders to be 55 years of age or older, based on the Fair Housing Law governing age-qualified housing. 



Senior housing is usually age 62+ and may offer units for rent with other services included like meals, planned activities and transportation.

 

According to the American Housing Survey (AHS), conducted in odd numbered years by the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Census Bureau, as of 2005, only 1.4% of the 69 million owner-occupied units were specifically labeled "age-qualified" senior housing communities. While this might seem like a small number, about 10% of housing units were described by their residences as being located in a "mostly 55 years plus community" where most residents were older or retirees. 



This might seem small but these types of communities are one of the hottest trends in residential real estate.  The reasons are obvious.  The boomers are aging rapidly and have been accustomed to a life full of opportunity while living life on their own terms.  According to predictions from the U.S. Census and the NAHB, the amount of people 55+ has gone from 52.2 million people (21% of the population) in 1990 to a predicted 76.6 million (24.5% of the population in 2010.  This is increasing demand for 55+ retirement communities with organized activities as well as people to take care of the standard chores of living.    Copyright 55CommunityGuide.com


 Central Florida is a retirement dream!   08/20/2010 - By Susan Melton
    Central Florida is a retirement dream!
    Entrance
    Ridgewood Lakes Entrance
Florida is still one of the best places to retire because of the low cost of living and no state income taxes. Orlando has the best collection of theme parks, golf courses, great hospitals and health care and of course, the weather.
 
 
 
 

With dreams of watching fireworks from the Magic Kingdom and visiting Mickey Mouse and The Incredible Hulk at the world-famous theme parks.  Orlando is a retirement dream for many snowbirds.

With no state income tax, low taxes overall, and beautiful weather to boot, many people choose Orlando and the central Florida area to retire to their dream.  With the beach only an hour away, there is plenty to do, lots of tourist activities, and with the theme parks minutes away, family members will always find an excuse to visit!
 
One of the great things about Central Florida beyond the touristy activities is the relatively inexpensive lifestyle.  For someone used to big city prices, Orlando has very affordable homes in tight knit communities for all ages.
 
With cheap flights to almost anywhere (including overseas), miles of roads, and an easy-going lifestyle, Central Florida is a great place for anyone to retire.  Below are two "Active Adult" communities for you to consider.

Ridgewood Lakes is a gated master planned community located in the Heart of Florida 30 miles southwest of Orlando.  It is one of the finest and most popular developments in the area.  It a natural fit for two active adult communities.  Ridgewood Lakes offers an 18 hole championship golf course with a pro shop, driving range, grill, tennis courts, landscaped nature walks, and hundreds of acres of preserved land.  The golf course has been recognized as one of the most tropical settings in Central Florida.  The fairways are surrounded by lush palm trees, tropical plants, natural lakes and colorful flowers.  It is located just two miles south of Interstate 4 on U.S. Highway 27 which has been known as the "Active Adult Corridor". It is convenient to everything you might need and want.  There is endless shopping centers, malls, and local premium outlets.  The medical facilities and the Heart of Florida hospital are two miles from the entrance.  Your wide-eyed grandkids will only be a short ride away from many world-class theme parks.  Orlando International   Airport is an easy 30 minute drive  and the beaches in either direction are about  80 miles.  Kennedy Space Center would be another thing that would fascinate your grandkids and yourself.  The attractions and getaways are endless.
 

High Vista at Ridgewood Lakes is a 55 plus active adult community and has 623 homes with a 12,000 square foot clubhouse.  It was completed in 2005 after opening in 1995. It has a ballroom, craft room, card room, kitchen, exercise room, library and small pub for gathering and watching TV.
The outdoor activities include a large heated pool and spa, tennis courts, shuffleboard, and horseshoe area.  There are plenty of activities like a computer club, investment club, bridge club, Bible study, book club and much more.  Most of the floor plans include two car garages and some cart garages.  They start at 1,300 square feet and go up to 2,600. The prices range from the low $100’s to the mid $300’s.


Affordable Retirement Communities 02/17/2010 - By Staff

When searching for affordable places to retire, you don’t want to give up the possibility of living a full and active life in the process.

Affordable Retirement Communities 


Therefore, when retiring on a tight budget, you will want to find the location and type of affordable retirement communities that will give you the most bang.

 

Asheville, North Carolina

 

Asheville is located in a beautiful spot where the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Great Smoky Mountains come together.  In addition to its lovely setting, Asheville offers an excellent health care system and an amazing arts scene.  If you are adverse to the cold, Asheville NC is a great choice as it enjoys very short winters.

 

In downtown Asheville, you can enjoy browsing through numerous antique shops, craft galleries, and bookstores.  Coffeehouses are also in abundance in this area.  Music is also an important part of the community, with live performances taking place on a regular basis. Of course, plenty of nature opportunities exist as well, including fishing, hiking, and whitewater rafting in the Blue Ridge Parkway – all of this for an affordable median house price of $188,600.

 

 

Bellingham, Washington

 

Bellingham WA can be found nestled between Vancouver and Seattle along the Pacific Northwest coast.  It offers Victorian homes, a seaside marina, freshwater lakes, lush forests, and snow-capped mountains.

 

You can also enjoy a number of recreational activities in Bellingham. Some of the more popular activities in the area include sailing, kayaking, and snowboarding. Here, the median house price is an affordable $163,000.

 

 

Charleston, South Carolina

 

Charleston SC has a charming and legendary look that includes cobblestone streets, antebellum homes, and full gardens.  In addition to its lovely appearance, it also boasts nine colleges and universities and one of the most highly respected health care communities in the country.

 

Moving into one of the19th century "fixer uppers" in Charleston will cost you a substantial amount of money, you can find a home on one of the nearby barrier islands for a very reasonable price.  Here, you can enjoy many opportunities for golf, fishing, boating and more.  A home in this area will cost a median price of $162.700 which is an affordable retirement community.




Fayetteville, Arkansas

 

Fayetteville AR is a quaint town in the Ozarks that shatters the myth of these areas suffering from a dirt poor economy.  In reality, the economy is quite strong in this area, which also boasts of having very little crime and one of the lowest costs of living in the nation.

 

Fayetteville also offers clear mountain lakes that are ideal or fishing.  The University of Arkansas is also located in the city, which contains a lovely mixture of historic buildings and modern architecture. A home in this city costs a median price of $122,500.  Westminster Village  Blytheville,
AR bills itself as affordable retirement.




Gainesville, Florida

 

Gainesville FL offers all of the same sites and attractions that have long drawn people to the Florida area upon retirement.  Here, you can enjoy the freshwater springs by fishing, swimming, and canoeing.  If you want to enjoy the Atlantic Coast beaches, they are only 60 miles away.

 

Gainesville also has some of the best health care available in all of Florida, including five university hospitals.  Nonetheless, the median price of a home in this area is just $130,800.

 

 

Iowa City, Iowa

 

Iowa City doesn’t have the best weather in the United States, but it offers a number of attractions that make it a great location to retire and still enjoy all four seasons of the year.  Here, you will find three medical centers, a University, and a strong job climate.

 

In Iowa City, you will also enjoy a life of culture and small town friendliness.  In addition, the abundance of homes located on the Iowa River make it possible to enjoy a number of outdoor recreational activities.  A home here costs a median price of $148,500.

 
Tips for Buying a Home in a 55+ Community   01/04/2011 - By Robert Fowler - 55CommunityGuide.com
    Tips for Buying a Home in a 55+ Community
    Home in 55 Community
Buying in a 55+ community will be very similar to buying in any community but there are some differences to be aware of.
Assuming you already know the 55+ community you are interested in, just looking within the community itself, here are some questions to explore when buying a home:

55 + Home Buying Tips
1. Find out about the monthly homeowner's association fee; what does it cover, how much is it and when is it expected to go up. If the community is older, find out if any special assessments are coming up or expected.
 
2. Get a copy of the homeowner association documents. Before you buy, review the rules of the association. Find out the rule for any areas of special interest to you, like pets, additions like building a patio or fence, visitors, children, leasing your property, etc.
 
3. Find out about the amenities. Remember in this economy many clubhouses and other amenities that were planned will not get build for some time, if ever.
 
4. Find out about activities offered. How often, what types, any extra fees?
 
5. Look at resales, not just brand new properties. Maybe you can get a deal on a resale that has been upgraded substantially. Preview listings with a resale real estate agent and ask questions about the property and the community as well.
 
6. Talk with the current owners/residents to see how happy they are living in the community and how happy you will be living with them. Are they your age? People love to talk, so ask questions.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Making the Move to Independent Retirement Living04/22/2010

A recent AARP poll found that nearly 60 percent of Boomers say they are concerned about living independently, and more than 50 percent say they have begun to think about how they would pay for independent living assistance as they get older.









Making the Move to
Independent Retirement Living



When 72-year-old Army veteran Ted Eickhoff was at his local
VA hospital for an appointment recently, he struck up a conversation with
another patient about selling his home and downsizing. As luck would have it,
Eickhoff’s fellow patient lived in a local independent retirement community
owned by Holiday Retirement, and raved about the benefits. Eickhoff was
sold.


"I couldn’t believe how much you get for the money," said
Eickhoff. "It is so nice to have everything taken care of with just one monthly
payment. It covers everything I need, including amazing meals. And if you need
another snack, the chefs just make it for you!"


Eickhoff, a retired
Command Sergeant Major, is part of a growing number of seniors who are planning
for an independent living future.


In fact, a recent AARP poll found that nearly 60 percent of
Boomers say they are concerned about living independently, and more than 50
percent say they have begun to think about how they would pay for independent
living assistance as they get older.






Crunching the Numbers


Mereen Klein, 86, started looking at the costs of keeping
her own apartment versus independent living when her eyesight declined. Klein
needed assistance with transportation and didn’t want to keep bugging her son
to drive her around, so she decided to move to an independent retirement living
community that met her needs.


"It was right for me with my fixed income, and the money
covers everything," said Klein. "I don’t pay for TV, or to have my room
cleaned. I couldn’t believe what I got for the money - it was really
something."


To determine what makes financial sense, seniors need to add
up the true costs of managing a home versus being part of a retirement
community.


"Even if you no longer have a mortgage payment, you still
have fluctuating monthly expenses including utilities, taxes, phone, cable and
food that can add up significantly," said Stan Brown, COO of Holiday
Retirement. "For many seniors, switching to a community that includes one
manageable, monthly flat fee gives them the ability to plan out the next 15 to
20 years and know exactly what they can expect to spend and what they can
afford."


For Klein, it not only made financial sense, it also gave
her back some of her freedom.


"I can take the community bus down to the bank or out to
dinner. I can even go to the doctor and my appointments without bugging anyone
for a ride," said Klein. "I have more independence now than when I lived
alone."






Ask the Right
Questions


To calculate the true costs of making the move to an
independent retirement community, Brown cautions seniors to ask as many
questions as possible prior to moving in, to uncover any buy-in fees, to
determine if a long-term lease is required and to see if the "feel" of the
community is right.


"It doesn’t make financial sense to make the move if you
aren’t comfortable in the new community and will want to move out within a few
months," said Brown. "It needs to not only be affordable, but a great place to
live as well."


Seventy three-year-old Julianne (Judy) Kayatt knows this all
too well. She sold her home and moved into a community that didn’t offer much
for her money and wasn’t as caring as she’d hoped. After only a few months, she
started her search again and was fortunate to find that a Holiday Retirement
community
 was a perfect fit for her.


"My family likes that I am happy here, and I like that I can
still be independent and live here," said Kayatt. "I am free to go where I
want; I am enjoying activities and events and I’m surrounded by friends. I know
I can be happy here for a long time."






The Golden Years


Making the move to an independent living community can be an
affordable way to make the most of one’s retirement years. Kayatt, Klein and
Eickhoff have all seen the benefits to cutting ties to a house or an apartment in favor of community living.


Klein was able to take advantage of a promotion from Holiday
Retirement, which covered up to $1,000 of her moving expenses, and Kayatt
received her birthday month free when she moved in.


And as for Eickhoff, the payoff for him is being surrounded
by people his own age with shared experiences and a passion for living the good
life.


"This is everything I ever thought about doing when I
retired," said Eickhoff. "Sometimes people reminisce about the past being
great, but I was fighting in the military for 22 years and working hard, and
now these are my golden years. I can actually relax and people take care of me
for a change."


For more information on making the move to independent
retirement living, visit holidaytouch.com or call 1-800-322-0999.



 

 

Patricia Bergren
Patricia Bergren
(360) 798-6733